Board Members

 

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DR. GILLIAN BOWSER
Research Scientist
Department of Ecosystem Science and Sustainability, Colorado State University

Dr. Gillian Bowser is a native of Brooklyn, New York and she started her career as an art major attending LaGuardia High School of the Arts where she earned a degree in fine arts. Her academic career was in biology with an emphasis on wildlife and population genetics, however at the same time, Dr. Bowser had several art shows and one solo ceramic sculpture exhibition. Dr. Bowser’s career represents the nexus between art and science. She went on to become a wildlife biologist at Yellowstone National Park studying insects, bison, and rodents over 11 years. During the next ten years of her National Park Service Career, she worked on desert tortoises, habitat modeling, military overflight issues and international relations with China’s National Park system. Dr. Bowser spent two years in the headquarters office of the National Park Service working for the director of the National Parks Service where she assisted with policy briefs and other political documents. Dr. Bowser is now a research scientist at Colorado State University where her research is focused on biodiversity, sustainability and women scholarship. She leads interdisciplinary teams from multiple universities to do large-scale network analyses of women in sustainability.

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DR. JACK GREENE
Sustainability Council
Utah State University

Jack has been involved with environmental education from its inception in the early 80’s and introduced APES at Logan High in 1998. He has taught in many secondary and higher education institutions and helped launch the Utah Envirothon competition for high school students in the state of Utah. Jack is a College Board workshop consultant in the western states for A.P. environmental science, APES reader, and supervises science student teachers through the Utah State University College of Education.

Regarding pedagogy, Jack is a strong advocate of service learning, citizen science, place based education, and in getting his students involved in current environmental issues on the local level and beyond. He insists that his students base their actions and decisions on the best available science, economics, and social justice information.

He currently serves on the Utah State University Sustainability Council, Student Sustainability Office and launched a new class he developed on energy efficiency and renewable energy for the Bridgerland Applied Technology College, and has teamed with the Utah Regional Science Fairs to institute a Northern Utah Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Fair at the Salt Lake Community College.

Jack helped draft the No Child Left Inside resolution and proclamation for the Utah legislature, and shepherd it through the 2011 legislative session. Additionally, he helped launch the Cache Valley NCLI committee where he continues to be an active member. He has worked closely with the Utah Society of Environmental Education regarding the recently implemented Utah Green Schools program and the Utah NCLI initiative.

In addition, Jack has been heavily involved in creating a culture of sustainability in the National Park Service where he has worked with the national office and a number of National Parks on establishing a list serve on Climate Friendly Parks to allow over 200 parks to share their stories on reducing their carbon footprint and building “green teams”. Further, he has written new web pages highlighting their activities and history of sustainability. He has done similar work at Denali, Mt. Rainier. and Rocky Mountain National Parks and worked 11 seasons as a Wilderness Ranger for the USFS.

His favorite pursuits are in getting his students, friends, and family enamored with our marvelous space marble through engaging outdoor activities, both recreational and educational. He is an avid cross country skier, canoer, biker, and wildland runner.

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grimwood_charlieDR. CHARLIE GRIMWOOD
Vice President of Regional Development
Salina Regional Health Center

Charles (“Charlie”) Grimwood is Vice President – Regional Development at Salina Regional Health Center, a medical center serving over fourteen counties in central and north central Kansas. In addition to receiving his BS degree in outdoor recreation from Colorado State University, he holds MS and PhD degrees in ecology from Kansas State University and the MS degree in administration from Central Michigan University.

Dr. Grimwood led development of the Sunflower Health Network, a network of seventeen hospitals, helping sustain access to health care across ten thousand square miles of rural Kansas. He also led development of a Level III regional trauma service and the only comprehensive behavioral health program between Topeka and Denver.

Grimwood has served as a volunteer Senior Examiner for the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program, sponsor of the prestigious Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award under the aegis of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. He has been the board chair and led campaigns for United Way and was a 28-year member of a county board of health, serving multiple terms as its chair.

Grimwood is the founder of Grimwood Strategies, LLC, through which he has helped build a health network in rural New England, expand access to breast cancer screenings and care in a rural area in the Great Plains, and provided pro bono strategic planning and performance consulting for public schools, non-profit foundations, and Rocky Mountain Sustainability and Science Network (RMSSN). RMSSN is a network of scientists across the Rocky Mountain states who are collaborating to develop future leaders in global sustainability.

Grimwood is a member of the Dean’s Advisory Council for the Warner College of Natural Resources at Colorado State University and the Board of Trustees of Kansas Wesleyan University. Dr. Grimwood is a Fellow in the American College of Healthcare Executives. In 2012 he was recognized as a distinguished alumnus of Colorado State University as recipient of the Charles A. Lory Public Service Award.

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Hall_KarenDR. KAREN HALL
Co-owner, Managing Member
Thousand Arbor Refuge

Karen grew up on 50 acres in the mountains of North Carolina. In this land that once belonged to Cherokee people, her grandmother tossed her outside to play and this was the impetus for a career tied to nature and culture. Karen earned her B.S. in Biology, M.S. in Botany and Ph.D. in Plant Physiology from Western Carolina University and Clemson University, respectively. Her dissertation work with Cherokee people was focused on learning how they use plants as medicine so that they might continue that aspect of traditional identity. Previously, Karen was an Extension Assistant Professor for Clemson University (Director, SC Master Naturalist program and SC Master Gardener programs) and Applied Ecologist for the Botanical Research Institute of Texas.

Karen began work with RMSSN in 2011 when she was invited to participate in a Network meeting in the Grand Tetons, as a representative of the Open Science Network in Ethnobiology (OSN). Like RMSSN, OSN was also an NSF-sponsored Research Coordination Network.  Karen quickly fell in love with western mountains and people. She was delighted to become a faculty mentor and member of the board of RMSSN and later a Chair of OSN. Bridging these two networks has been exciting for her and has hopefully helped NSF better understand alternative models for funding relevant scientific research.

After living her entire life in the southeast, Karen recently moved to Eugene, Oregon to begin Thousand Arbor Refuge, LLC., with several business partners. The farm is built for conservation of flavor, largely through cider apples. The challenge of the business model is to conserve agrodiverse fruit trees at the same time as enhancing and improving resilience of the systems (social and natural) in which the orchards are embedded.
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at NMUDR. DIANE HUSIC
Dean, School of Natural and Health Sciences
Moravian College

D. Husic received her B.S.in Biochemistry from Northern Michigan University and her Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Michigan State University (1986). Her thesis examined the enzymes of photorespiration and evolutionary relationships between bacteria, algae and higher plants. In 1988, she accepted a tenure track position in the Department of Chemistry at East Stroudsburg University (PA) where she was in charge of the Biochemistry program and helped to develop the new Biotechnology degree programs. She served as chair of the department before moving to Moravian College to serve as Chair of the Department of Biological Sciences and co-coordinator of the Biochemistry program in 2004.

She has taught courses ranging from environmental science for non-majors to graduate level biochemistry courses. Perhaps most unusual are the course on climate change that she teaches with a music historian and her course entitled Redefining Prosperity: Moving towards a Culture of Sustainability.

In 2005, her research took a new turn as she was involved with an NSF project aimed at getting more undergraduates interested in plant science. She has engaged undergraduate researchers at the Palmerton Superfund site examining heavy metal uptake in early successional plants and studying the restoration of a functioning ecosystem at a site once devoid of vegetation. She conducts ecological assessments (inventories of plants, birds, butterflies and invasive species), especially along the Kittatinny Ridge (Blue Mountain), monitors habitat for impacts of a changing climate, and serves as the coordinator of the Eastern Pennsylvania Phenology Project. She engages the public in research through citizen science projects.

She is an author on over 40 publications and has contributed to a number of reports – including a 200-page ecological assessment of the restoration of a Superfund site, the 2011 PA Climate Change Adaptation report, and the Council on Undergraduate Research publication “Transformative Research at Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions”.

Moravian College is a credentialed civil society observer for the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and she has attended the international COP meetings as an official delegate for the past four years. She serves as one of 8 members of the international steering committee for the Research and Independent NGOs constituency group (RINGOs) officially recognized as a key focal point for the UNFCCC process.

She has been a participant in the Keck/PKAL Facilitating Interdisciplinary Learning Project and was honored as an Audubon Together Green Fellow in Conservation Leadership. She serves on the board for the Lehigh Gap Nature Center and is involved with various projects with the Nurture Nature Center and National Geographic. She has also served as president of two national organizations (the Faculty Athletics Representatives Association and the Council on Undergraduate Research) and for the past 11 years, has developed and facilitated NCAA national leadership institutes.

She is an author on over 40 publications and has contributed to a number of reports – including a 200 page ecological assessment of the restoration of a Superfund site, the 2011 PA Climate Change Adaptation report, and the Council on Undergraduate Research publication “Transformative Research at Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions”.

Moravian College is a credentialed civil society observer for the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and she has attended the international COP meetings as an official delegate for the past four years. She serves as one of 8 members of the international steering committee for the Research and Independent NGOs constituency group (RINGOs) officially recognized as a key focal point for the UNFCCC process.

Over the past few years, she has been a participant in the Keck/PKAL Facilitating Interdisciplinary Learning Project and was honored as an Audubon Together Green Fellow in Conservation Leadership. She serves on the boards for the Lehigh Valley Audubon Society and the Lehigh Gap Nature Center and is involved with grant-funded projects for the Nurture Nature Center in Easton.

She has served as president of two national organizations (the Faculty Athletics Representatives Association and the Council on Undergraduate Research) and for the past 8 years, has developed and facilitated NCAA national leadership institutes for Division II Faculty Athletics Representatives.

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Reynolds_JTJT REYNOLDS
National Parks Conservation Association Board of Trustees

James T. Reynolds (JT) started his NPS career during the summer after his junior year while majoring in Recreation and Parks Management with a minor in Wildlife Management at Texas A&M University. One summer was spent at Everglades National Park as a seasonal park ranger, performing “anti-alligator” poaching patrols. He also landed his first permanent National Park Service (NPS) job at the Natchez Trace Parkway in Tupelo, Mississippi after graduation.

After completing his military obligation in 1972, JT returned to the NPS in Washington, D.C. as an Environmental Education Specialist working with middle school teachers and taking inner city youth to local and regional NPS areas to camp and experience the natural environment.

After completing Introduction to Park Operations (Ranger School) at Albright Training Center, Grand Canyon, in 1973, JT was hired as the supervisory park ranger of the Yosemite Valley Mall Patrol. While stationed at Yosemite, he also served as the Assistant Back Country Supervisor and as the Assistant Wawona District Ranger.

In 1978, JT transferred to Everglades NP as the Flamingo District Ranger. His next assignments afforded him the opportunity to become a well-rounded NPS employee. He worked at some of the Services’ more popular units and regional offices: member of a team of rangers who patrolled Gates of the Arctic and Wrangles St. Elias National Parks enforcing interim regulations after these areas were proclaimed as national monuments by President Carter; return to Albright Training Center as the Training Manager for Rangers and Resource Management Specialist; serve as the Acting Superintendent at Petrified Forest National Park (1984) for three months until a new superintendent was hired; In 1987, he trained rangers at Lake Malawi National Park in Africa; later transferred to the North Atlantic Region in Boston as the Chief of Ranger Activities and Natural Resources; transferred to the Rocky Mountain Regional Office in Denver in December 1989 and served as the Chief of Ranger Activities and Risk Management; after the associated regional director retired, the regional director asked him to serve as the Associate Regional Director for Park Operations for one and one half years; during his regional office assignment, the NPS reorganized and JT was hired as the Colorado Plateau Support Office Superintendent in June, 1995; JT was assigned to Grand Canyon National Park as the Deputy Superintendent in 1997; and he transferred to Death Valley National Park in January 2001 during the ceremony/celebration of the passing of the Timbisha Shoshone Homeland Act. One of JT’s proud accomplishments while at Death Valley was enhancing the park’s efforts to reach out to youth. The park’s youth education program has evolved and now Death Valley ROCKS (recreation outdoor campaign for kids thru study) is the standard.

JT retired January 2009 after many years (41) of federal service. He now serves on several councils and boards: National Parks Conservation Association Board of Trustees, Coalition of National Park Service Retirees Executive Council, Quiet Storm Foundation member and Quiet Storm Youth Advisory Council (Adult Advisor for Youth Activities).

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WayneWAYNE TURNER
Executive Director
Ashokan Center, Catskills , NY

Wayne Turner has served in a number of leadership capacities within nonprofit organizations working at the intersection of education and nature and sharing his experience in management, fundraising, and team-building. From leading a $40 million capital campaign for Teton Science Schools to his most recent post as executive director at the Ashokan Center in the Catskills of New York, Wayne brings energy, enthusiasm, and experience to a wide array of projects and programs. Originally from Westport, Massachusetts, Wayne and his wife Polly met at Teton Science Schools where she joined the faculty there after completing the Science Schools’ Graduate Program. They have two daughters, Phoebe and Wren and make their home in the Pacific Northwest.
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M.A. RITA M. VERMONT- RICALDE
Coordinator of Accreditations and Professor at the Biology PrograM
Campus of Biological and Agropecuary Sciences
Autonomous University of Yucatan

RitaRita received her B.S. in Dental Surgery from the Autonomous University of Yucatan (1976) and her M.A. in Higher Education from Michigan State University, majoring in Curriculum Design and Adult Education (1981). She also holds a Diploma in Environmental Education (1998), other in Pedagogical Qualification (2011) and another in Curricula by competences design (2013).

She entered the Autonomous University of Yucatan in 1974, teaching courses of Biology, Chemistry and English at high school level. Also served there as Coordinator of Foreign languages (1974-1985). At the Biology Program of the Campus of Biological and Agropecuary Sciences she has been Academic Coordinator (1985-2006) Coordinator (2006-2014) and Coordinator of Accreditations (2015 up to date). She also teaches courses of Environmental Education, Teaching of Biological Sciences and Scientific communication. She has coordinated and participated in the design of the Biology program curricula of 1998 and 2013; in the 1993 and 2005 of the Master degree Program in Management and conservation   of tropical natural resources, as well of the Plan for the Development 2011-2020 of the Biology Program.

Rita is member of the Autonomous University of Yucatan Prioritary Institutional Program of Environmental Management from 2007. Member of the Biotic Resources Mesoamerican Network from 2010; member of the Academic Group of Floristic Resources from Mesoamerica; member of the RMSSN from 2010 and of RMSSN Board from 2011.

She has done research and published articles and book chapters related to Natural resources management, Environmental Education and alumni and students trajectories.


 Carrie Lederer, Videographer and documentarian

 

 

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